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Right Relationship with God

Right Relationship with God

Luke 11:5-13

by Terry A. DeYoung

An important factor in prayer is recognizing the one to whom we pray. In providing his disciples with a template for prayer, Jesus begins with prayer’s relational component, addressing God as Father, and not as an impersonal, universal force. The depth of our prayer life reflects the intimate, personal relationship that we have with the God of the universe, the one who created all that is, seen and unseen.

Luke carefully includes more about prayer than simply Jesus’ template, which we know as the Lord’s Prayer Jesus also teaches his disciples about the practice of prayer (verses 5-10) and the basis for our prayers (verses 11-13).

Luke does not include the parable about getting what we want or need through sheer persistence and perseverance to teach us a lesson in how God dispenses blessings or answers the prayers of the people. Rather than picturing God as one who will respond only when pestered unceasingly, the parable illustrates the importance of regular, ongoing communion with God.  Prayer is not an occasional text message sent to a virtual father but a continual sharing with the One who is always tuned into us.

How then does this God respond to those who in prayer regularly ask, search, and knock? The Holy One graciously exceeds our expectations.” If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” God responds to our need with the gift of the Holy Spirit-even before we know enough to ask, seek, or knock for the indwelling of God in our lives.

The Holy Spirit is the key to our praying and our persevering in prayer. Although Jesus provides the model for prayer, the Holy Spirit gives life to the m o d el and to our communion with the Father.

PRAYER:

Our Father in heaven, through your Spirit give us new life and new power; grace our lives with your love. Amen.

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